(0 plays)

Circlet Presents Annabeth Leong is the third in our series of audio author profiles. Vinnie Tesla interviews Annabeth Leong, and then she reads an excerpt from her short story “Dear Kim.”

Some of the places you can find Annabeth’s writing:

You can find all of the Circlet Presents series at http://www.circlet.com/?tag=circlet-presents

Download

Ten Dirty Books Number Ten: The Marketplace series

lauraantoniou's series of novels about an elite underground community of masters, slaves, and slave trainers has been around for over 20 years now and shaped a generation of pervs. For the climax of Ten Dirty Books, three Circlet writers—Tammy Jo Eckhart, Kal Cobalt, and Madeline Elayne—describe how three volumes of the series have shaped their lives as writers and kinksters.

Also, we are in the last few hours of the giveaway! Sign up now, or be compelled to pay money for those Marketplace books to fill out your collection.

http://www.circlet.com/?p=5461

imageimageimage

"The very phrase “Edwardian schoolboy romp” sets my voyeuristic heart aflutter.

His connection to fin de siècle notables such as Oscar Wilde, C.A. Swinburne, Sir Richard Burton, and Aubrey Beardsley – who were then regarded as sexual outlaws, if not outright mollies – makes the question of Memoirs’ true authorship an intriguing one.

After few chapters of delightfully frisky bedtime dormitory antics, Blackie regales them with tales of his many erotic adventures – not just sex with men and women, but flagellation, cross-dressing, bisexual threesomes, lesbian orgies, and other frolics favored by the naughty Victorians. Naturally his saucy bedtime tales provoke the school-fellows to even more frequent and enthusiastic bouts of mutual frigging, sucking, and bum-fucking."

Violet Vernet’s article about “Memoirs of a Voluptuary” was so full of juicy quotes that we couldn’t pick just one. The whole thing is a delightful read.

http://www.circlet.com/?p=5453

(2 plays)

We’ve fallen behind on the Dirty Books this week here, but I can’t resist jumping the queue for a moment to tease tomorow’s climactic Dirty Book #10. We have a couple different appreciations of multiple volumes in a single beloved modern BDSM series with a special relationship to Circlet. And of that doesn’t give it away, the song above is another hint.

Download

For Dirty Book #8, award magnet Elisabeth Shechter describes how Kushiel’s Dart changed her life, ultimately turning her into that most terrifying of creatures, a writer of erotica.
http://www.circlet.com/?p=5448

For Dirty Book #8, award magnet Elisabeth Shechter describes how Kushiel’s Dart changed her life, ultimately turning her into that most terrifying of creatures, a writer of erotica.

http://www.circlet.com/?p=5448

"

Pandemonium Unlimited, or, A Strained Analogy


Trying to assess my battered mass-market paperback of The Pearl is like trying to write a book review of a library. There’s a cacophany of voices, some reciting bawdy spoofs of forgotten drinking songs, one obsessively detailing the blood trickling down birched posteriors, another firing off arch jokes about the chance of catching a glimpse of a young lady’s ankles when she climbs out of her carriage. Originally it was a magazine, illegally printed and distributed, featuring a mix of silly poems, terrible jokes, and serialized novels in each issue. It occurs to me that my love of The Pearl and my love of anarchic online fora like ASSTR have something in common–a pleasure in a messy, exuberant excess that is reminiscent, almost, or real life.

"

Dirty Book #6 is Vinnie Tesla attempting to explain his love of Victorian underground magazine The Pearl.

http://www.circlet.com/?p=5442

For Dirty Book #4, Julie Cox writes about the “thrilling sex” and “blatant escapism” of Circlet’s own The Erotofluidic Age by Vinnie Tesla:

The pseudo-Victorian atmosphere was pitch perfect, the characters were distinct and easy to attach to, the voice was consistent, the grammar was outstanding, and the sex was not only impossible, but at times perfectly, magnificently ridiculous.

Meanwhile, our giveaways continue, with opportunities to win both ebooks and print collections from Circlet Press.
http://www.circlet.com/?p=5430

For Dirty Book #4, Julie Cox writes about the “thrilling sex” and “blatant escapism” of Circlet’s own The Erotofluidic Age by Vinnie Tesla:

The pseudo-Victorian atmosphere was pitch perfect, the characters were distinct and easy to attach to, the voice was consistent, the grammar was outstanding, and the sex was not only impossible, but at times perfectly, magnificently ridiculous.

Meanwhile, our giveaways continue, with opportunities to win both ebooks and print collections from Circlet Press.

http://www.circlet.com/?p=5430

Greta Christina gives Circlet some love!

(0 plays)

For Dirty Book #3 critic and educator Dan Kimmel muses on the youthful influence a particular scene from The Godfather by Mario Puzo had on him.

Astonishingly, we manage to make it through the free books giveaway without a single “offer you can’t refuse” joke.

http://www.circlet.com/?p=5425

Download

Resources on Maker Culture

makersex:

I’ve been getting some questions about resources to look up for the MakerSex anthology, and I’m so glad that people are excited enough to ask! I wrote a paragraph to one person including a bunch of links, and realized this is something I should post for anyone who wants a few pointers to what I’ve got in mind.

MakerSex is a phrase I made up for the book title, but Maker Culture is something you can find plenty of information about. There’s a Wikipedia article, for starters.
Cory Doctorow is a very visible writer talking about Maker culture, and lots of his work can give you a sense of what it’s about. Check out Boing Boing, a blog that he writes for, or his novel Makers. You can download Makers for free (with Doctorow’s blessing).
Another place to look is the site for Make magazine. Or Instructables.
That’s also part of the purpose of this Tumblr. I’m planning to post inspiration here, including links to neat projects. One of the things I particularly want to do that isn’t well covered by the links above is highlight the contributions that have been made to Maker Culture by people other than young white males. For example, just as a bare start, Alison Lewis and Fang-Yu Lin did a bunch of really cool projects incorporating circuitry into sewing projects. You can see some of these in Switch Craft: Battery-Powered Crafts to Make and Sew. I love, love, love the combination of something thought to be “girly” (sewing) with something thought to be “masculine” (circuits). I really want to see stories that play with this edge and interrogate ideas of gender roles, who gets to be “smart” or “techie” and all the rest.